nanny, find a nanny
HIRING ON THE JOB CHILD DEVELOPMENT TAX INFO AGENCY DIRECTORY NEWSLETTERS HOME

Introducing a New Nanny? Seven Steps for Ensuring a Smooth Transition

Introducing your child to a new nanny, whether this is your child’s first nanny or the new nanny will be taking the place of a previous caregiver, can be stressful for everyone involved. Even with the best planning, there are sure to be unexpected bumps along the road, but a little preparation goes a long way towards smoothing the transition. Following are seven suggestions that may help:


  1. Acknowledge your child’s attachment to his previous caregiver: If your child had a strong bond with his or her previous nanny, understand that in order to bond with a new nanny, your child must come to terms with the loss of the previous caregiver. Explain the reasons for the transition. Acknowledge your child’s feelings toward his beloved nanny, and if possible, continue to maintain contact with her.
  2. Keep your child in the loop: If your child is old enough, get her “buy in” on the new nanny by involving her in the selection process. Ask her what she loved most about the previous nanny, and look for candidates with those qualities. If appropriate, involve your child in interview process and ask for her opinions. Explain why you are choosing the candidate you ultimately select.
  3. Give the new nanny a helping hand: Give her as much information as possible about your child. Let her know what your child valued most in his relationship with the previous nanny, and provide as much information as possible about your child’s likes, dislikes, fears, interests, favorite activities, and daily schedule.
  4. Be consistent: Help your new nanny to maintain a consistent structure and set of expectations for your child. Children feel most secure and comfortable when they are held to a consistent standard of behavior, regardless of who is in charge. Be clear with the nanny about your child’s schedule for meals and naptimes, and your expectation that the schedule will be followed as closely as possible. Make sure the new nanny understands what foods are permissible for meals and which are saved for occasional treats, and the limits your family enforces on time spent watching television or using the computer.
  5. Spend time together: Ease the transition by inviting the new nanny to visit and play a few times before she officially starts work. Not only will this help your child to get acquainted with the new nanny, but your child will develop trust in the nanny if she sees that you trust the nanny, too. Make sure you communicate this trust verbally and through your body language towards the nanny. Try visiting a few of your child’s favorite places together, or participating in a few of her favorite at-home activities.
  6. Consider adjusting the schedule if needed: For some young children, maintaining a consistent daily schedule can help smooth transitions. Some children find it confusing to be in a nanny’s care occasionally – say three times a week for a full day – and are happier going for shorter periods Monday through Friday. If your work schedule permits it, you might want to consider shifting your hours if your child is having trouble adjusting to an inconsistent daily schedule.
  7. Know how to say “goodbye”: Make “goodbyes” easier by finding the right time and place to say them. It may be easier for some children to say “goodbye” if they are outside, or getting ready to go for a walk, as this may give them a sense that they are the one leaving for a fun activity. Just make sure your child understands that you are leaving, too, either by getting into your car or being dressed for an outing, so that he’s not disappointed when he returns home to find you gone. Make goodbyes quick, and let your child know when you’ll be home.

TOY REVIEW

Helmet Heroes
Fire up your child’s love of imaginative play with Playskool’s Helmet Heroes for children ages three and older. Aspiring race car drivers and police officers will enjoy hours of fun with these interactive helmets.

The Police Officer Helmet and a motorcycle-style handlebar give your budding trooper the experience of being in a virtual cruiser, powered by their imagination – and their little legs! The helmet sports flashing colored lights, a visor, and a working microphone, and buttons on the handlebar control sirens, horn, and revving sounds. Thirty different mission sequences will fuel your child’s imagination for hours, with music and action phrases like “Search and rescue in progress!” and “ Set up a road block!” to encourage imaginative play.

Hasbro’s Race Car Driver Helmet Heroes features a helmet and steering wheel style controller, with flashing light, flip-up visor, and a working microphone so your aspiring racer can communicate with an imaginary pit crew and fans. Buttons on the steering wheel control the lights on the helmet, and activate various engine noises. The toy offers 30 interactive racing adventures, to keep your child engaged for hours.

Each Helmet Heroes helmet comes with steering wheel controller, 3 fun cut-out accessories and instructions. Helmet includes 3 “AAA” batteries. Controller includes 2 “AA” batteries

These articles provide information of a general nature only, and should be used only to supplement your knowledge. We hope you find the articles interesting, but Nanny.com cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained in these articles. Nothing in these articles is intended as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your own physician if you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child.
INA Releases New Book: Beyond Parenting Basics: The International Nanny Association’s Official Guide to In-Home Child Care
On September 1st, the International Nanny Association released its new book, Beyond Parenting Basics: The International Nanny Association’s Official Guide to In-Home Child Care, a must-read for all professional nannies. According to the INA, the book “was developed to help prepare caregivers and parents for the responsibility that comes along with being a primary caregiver.”

The book was co-authored by Sara McCormack Hoffman, director of the Professional Nanny Program at Minnesota State College and author of several previous books for nannies and working parents, and Michelle LaRowe. Topics covered include:
  • Health and Safety Language
  • Literacy
  • Physical Development
  • Social Development
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Emotional Development
  • Professionalism
  • Nutrition
For more information, visit the INA website
Sponsors
Find Great Child Care at Care.com
Sittercity Nanny Search
Enter your zipcode to find a nanny in your area:
  
      Home       |       Contact Us       |       Links       |       Agency Directory Copyright 2015 Nanny.com

These articles provide information of a general nature only, and should be used only to supplement your knowledge. We hope you find the articles interesting, but Nanny.com cannot guarantee the accuracy or completeness of any information contained in these articles. Nothing in these articles is intended as a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult with your own physician if you have any concerns about your own health or the health of your child.